KURIU VILNIŲ



Some time ago we have put forward an application for this year’s public art funding program ‘Kuriu Vilnių’ organised by Vilnius Municipality. Collaborating with Architecture Fund, Vilnius Museum and Lithuanian Interdisciplinary Artists’ Association we proposed to build a pavilion in P.Cvirka square which would serve as meeting ground for the debates about the future of this space. The project aims to engage with different problematics that relate to the legacy of soviet monuments in contemporary public space and provide a meeting point where different knowledges, worldviews and opinions could be negotiated.





VIEW OF PROPOSED PAVILION FROM STREET LEVEL. SUGGESTED DESIGN SEEKS TO REDUCE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MONUMENT IN THE SQUARE WHILE MAKING IT THE MAIN OBJECT UNDER DISCUSSION AT THE INSIDE SPACE OF THE PAVILION. THE ROOF IS USED AS TERRACE SUGGESTING VIEWS TO THE SQUARE FROM THE EYE LEVEL OF THE MONUMENT WHILE AT THE SAME TIME MAKING IT A PLATFORM TO DISCUSS THE FUTURE OF THIS URBAN SPAC








The main idea was that during warm summer months the pavilion, designed together with architect Sandra Dumčiūtė, should become home for different talks and discussions amongst Vilnius residents, guests, academics and artists. It would also serve as a meeting point for curated walks, platform for various surveys and home for many different events. Besides engaging with complexities of Soviet monument legacy proposed design also seeks to rearticulate this central yet not very lively urban space. We hope that with this project we could trigger a sound and productive public debate about the future of this square.








ROUND IN PLAN SUGGESTED PAVILION IS BUILT AROUND THE SCULPTURE AT THE CIRCULAR TERRACE THAT SERVES AS A PLINTH. THE MONUMENT BASE BECOMES AN ABSTRACT FEATURE OF THE SMALL PATIO WHILE THE SCULPURE ITSELF FALLS BACK TO THE BACKGROUND. 

Since COVID - 19 pandemic started and everyone has been touched by quarantine and isolation period, this bizarre new reality have filled our heads with thoughts about slowly evolving changes in our relationship to public space and landscape. One of the more immediate questions during this period is how can we recreate the complexities of public interaction that unfolds in physical public spaces by virtual means and what kind of expertise we as public realm designers can bring to this process. We are currently exploring different ways to rearticulate our proposal for ‘Kuriu Vilniui’ programme that suddenly could not be realized in the shape that was proposed for the application. The pavilion around P.Cvirka sculpture in Vilnius, that would have served as a meeting ground for the discussions of divisive issues related to controvertial soviet era sculpture and its faith, would no longer serve its main aim and, even with physical distancing rules relaxed, would not be accessible to all the audiences concerned. Working together with our curatorial partners and other specialists we aim to create the right virtual alternative for this place that would enable us to host this expanded public consultation process with the originally planned accompanying programme of lectures, talks and walks.


Mark